Why I Teach about the Holocaust: Photo Attributions

See below for descriptions of historic photos in IHN article

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The original German caption reads: "Forcibly pulled out of dug-outs." One of the most famous pictures of World War II
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The original German caption reads: “Forcibly pulled out of dug-outs.” One of the most famous pictures of World War II. From Wikimedia Commons. Public domain. Photo credit: Jürgen Stroop Report to Heinrich Himmler from May 1943


Nazi concentration camp guards of Auschwitz on a retreat not far from the camp at all. They are well aware of the horrors they are allowing to happen, and even causing, and look genuinely happy.
Nazi concentration camp guards of Auschwitz on a retreat not far from the camp at all. They are well aware of the horrors they are allowing to happen, and even causing, and look genuinely happy. Photo credit: Philadelphia University, “Psychological Aspects Behind the Causes of the Holocaust.”


Members of the Nazi occupation authorities gather outside a wall dividing the ghetto from the rest of Warsaw

Members of the Nazi occupation authorities gather outside a wall dividing the ghetto from the rest of Warsaw. Joseph Goebbels called the ghettos “death boxes.” Photo credit: Meczenstwo Walka, Zaglada Zydów Polsce 1939-1945. Poland. No. 78.


Warsaw ghetto, 1941. Homeless children
Warsaw ghetto, 1941. Homeless children. Photo credit: Meczenstwo Walka, Zaglada Zydów Polsce 1939-1945. Poland. No. 126.


SS troops guard members of the Jewish resistance captured during the suppression of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
SS troops guard members of the Jewish resistance captured during the suppression of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The original German caption reads: “These bandits offered armed resistance.” Photo credit: Polish National Archives.


A German policeman checks the identification papers of Jews in the Krakow ghetto
A German policeman checks the identification papers of Jews in the Krakow ghetto. Photo credit: Archiwum Panstwowe w Krakowie.


Jewish women and children who have already surrendered their belongings form a small group as others in the background are ordered to discard their outer clothing and their possessions prior to execution
Jewish women and children who have already surrendered their belongings form a small group as others in the background are ordered to discard their outer clothing and their possessions prior to execution. Photograph was taken October 16, 1941 in Lubny, the Ukraine. Photo credit: Hessisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


Forced labor at the Ravensbrück concentration camp
Forced labor at the Ravensbrück concentration camp. Photo credit: USHMM Photo Archives.


Starved prisoners, nearly dead from hunger, pose in concentration camp in Ebensee, Austria
Starved prisoners, nearly dead from hunger, pose in concentration camp in Ebensee, Austria. Ebensee was a sub-camp of the main camp “Mauthausen” near the town of the same name. The camp was reputedly used for “scientific” experiments. It was liberated by the 80th Division of the U.S. Army. Photo credit: National Archives and Records Administration.


Jewish children, kept alive in the Auschwitz II (Birkenau) concentration camp, pose in concentration camp uniforms between two rows of barbed wire fencing after liberation
Jewish children, kept alive in the Auschwitz II (Birkenau) concentration camp, pose in concentration camp uniforms between two rows of barbed wire fencing after liberation. Still from a postwar Soviet film. Photo credit: Polish Central State Archive of Film, Photo and Phonographic Documents.


Prisoners from Buchenwald awaiting execution in the forest near the camp
Prisoners from Buchenwald awaiting execution in the forest near the camp. Photo credit: USHMM Photo Archives.


The death train in Dachau, April 30, 1945
The death train in Dachau, April 30, 1945. Photo credit: Glowna Komisja Badania Zbrodni Przeciwko Narodowi Polskiemu, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


A warehouse filled with containers of Zyklon B (poison gas pellets) at the Majdanek death camp
A warehouse filled with containers of Zyklon B (poison gas pellets) at the Majdanek death camp. Photo credit: Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


The gate at Mauthausen
The gate at Mauthausen. Photo credit: USHMM Photo Archives.


Prisoners in the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen, Germany, December 19, 1938
Prisoners in the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen, Germany, December 19, 1938. Photo Credit: National Archives and Records Administration, item 242-HLB-3609-25.


A group of Jewish men awaiting death in a gas van at the Chelmno death camp
A group of Jewish men awaiting death in a gas van at the Chelmno death camp. Photo credit: Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


Close-up of a Gypsy couple sitting in an open area in the Belzec concentration camp
Close-up of a Gypsy couple sitting in an open area in the Belzec concentration camp. Photo credit: Glowna Komisja Badania Zbrodni Przeciwko Narodowi Polskiemu, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


A woman about to be executed in the Belzec concentration camp
A woman about to be executed in the Belzec concentration camp. Photo credit: Leopold Page Photographic Collection.


Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp
Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. Photo credit: Israel Arbeiter Gallery of Understanding


A German girl is overcome as she walks past the exhumed bodies of some of the 800 slave workers murdered by the SS guards near Namering, Germany, and laid here so that townspeople may view the work of their Nazi leaders
A German girl is overcome as she walks past the exhumed bodies of some of the 800 slave workers murdered by the SS guards near Namering, Germany, and laid here so that townspeople may view the work of their Nazi leaders. Photo Credit: National Archives and Records Administration, item 111-SC-264895. Cpl. Edward Belfer, photographer, May 17, 1945.


The famous, almost biblical, picture of the German soldier shooting a woman and child
The famous, almost biblical, picture of the German soldier shooting a woman and child. This photograph was sent home through the mail by a German to friends or family. He was clearly proud of his actions. On the back was written “Ukraine 1942, Jewish Aktion, Ivangorod.” Photo credit: MarkHumphrys.com.


UN Peace keepers collecting bodies from Ahmići, Bosnia and Herzegovina in April 1993
UN Peace keepers collecting bodies from Ahmići, Bosnia and Herzegovina in April 1993. Photo credit: Photograph provided courtesy of the ICTY.


Skulls of Khmer Rouge victims
Skulls of Khmer Rouge victims. Photo credit: Adam Carr.


The Rwandan genocide began on April 7, 1994. In the 100 days before its end, nearly 800,000 people were murdered, including 300,000 children
The Rwandan genocide began on April 7, 1994. In the 100 days before its end, nearly 800,000 people were murdered, including 300,000 children. Photo: Corinne Dufka/Reuters.


Heinrich Himmler, Viktor Lutze, Adolf Hitler and Rudolph Hess standing in the Luitpoldhalle
Heinrich Himmler, Viktor Lutze, Adolf Hitler and Rudolph Hess standing in the Luitpoldhalle. Photo credit: Historical Nazi Third Reich image.


View of the entrance to the main camp of Auschwitz (Auschwitz I)
View of the entrance to the main camp of Auschwitz (Auschwitz I). The gate bears the motto “Arbeit Macht Frei” (Work makes one free). Photo credit: Glowna Komisja Badania Zbrodni Przeciwko Narodowi Polskiemu, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.


Tourists visit the Hall of Names in the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum, May 1, 2011, in Jerusalem, on the eve of Israel's Holocaust Remembrance Day
Tourists visit the Hall of Names in the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum, May 1, 2011, in Jerusalem, on the eve of Israel’s Holocaust Remembrance Day. Photo credit: Yad Vashem.


American soldiers liberating prisoners from the Nazi concentration camp at the end of WWII
Top image: American soldiers liberating prisoners from the Nazi concentration camp at the end of WWII. Location: Woebbelin, Germany. Date taken: 1945. Photo credit: Life Magazine.


Read the full article:

“Why I Teach about the Holocaust”

Learn more about the Holocaust Through Multiple Lenses course at Inver Hills by contacting:

Vicky Knickerbocker
Sociology, Humanities and Human Services Instructor
651-450-3745

 

2 Comments

  • Pingback: Why I Teach about the Holocaust | Inver Hills Magazine
  • Keep talking about the Holocaust. I’ve seen first hand that everything in life is cyclical. I’ve been around the world a few times and this awful madness is returning. anti-Semitism is rising everywhere. The Jews in America are literally blind to what’s happening and what could happen quickly. They gave no idea how their really viewed. I don’t know why they move toward liberal ideology. That is what will destroy them in the end. My grandparents saw it in Europe, specifically, in Germany during the early 1930s while visiting. They never forgot how incredibly oblivious the Jews were and how it cost them everything in the end.

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